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Archive: September 2016

Taiwo Afolabi - Blog 1: Introductory Podcast

Post type: 
Blog post

In this self-introductory podcast, Taiwo Afolabi, a QES scholar at the Centre for Asia-Pacific Initiatives (CAPI), University of Victoria, speaks on his research that he will be undertaking for the upcoming year.

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  Download: taiwoafolabi.mp3
5.31 MB

Jeanique Tucker - Blog 1: Introduction

Post type: 
Blog post

Hi, I am Jeanique and I am one of CAPI's new incoming scholars.  In this podcast I say a little about myself and my background, as well as about my research. Hope you enjoy!

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  Download: first_podcast.mp3
8.11 MB

Janice Dowson - Blog 5: Women's Day - 20,000 Women Knocking

Post type: 
Blog post

Janice Dowson

5 September 2016

Victoria, B.C.

Labour and Enterprise Policy Research Institute

20,000 Women Knocking: National Women's Day, 9 August

This blog explores the 1956 Women's March, where 20,000 women marched to the Union Buildings in Pretoria to deliver a petition. Further, it discusses the strides for women's equality since the 1994 democratic transition and the annual public holiday: Women's Day. 

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janice_dowson_-_blog_5_womens_day.pdf1.05 MB

Joel Toorenburgh - Blog 4: The Voice

Post type: 
Blog post

"There is a voice inside of you
That whispers all day long,
"I feel this is right for me,
I know that this is wrong."
No teacher, preacher, parent, friend
Or wise man can decide
What's right for you--just listen to

Zachary Brabazon - Blog 4: Privilege, Mobility, and the Passport

Post type: 
Blog post

This blog primarily focuses on interpersonal interactions, the kind that hammer reading points home in an emotional way.  I really value the ‘living context’ that these encounters give to all that I read about migration in Bangladesh, and this is why I chose to write what I did.